Monthly Archives: September 2012

Why Polyglot Programming is a Fad

One of the considerations when building a new software product is the programming language or languages to use for development. Programming languages can be taken for just tools, like a hammer; one uses them to construct software applications. But more so, they are part of the software’s infrastructure: unlike a hammer, one cannot move to use a different tool on a whim: high switching costs are required.

A few years ago, the concept of polyglot programming has gained momentum and mind share. The idea was that one could develop software using multiple programming languages, all glued together, each optimized for a piece of the puzzle. The idea was largely enabled by the two major platforms (Java and .NET) including  support for language interoperability via virtual machines. People could program in multiple languages and still connect them together without clumsy inter-language binding mechanisms.

What’s interesting is that the concept has recently gained momentum again with the resurfacing of Java-based languages such as Groovy, Scala and Clojure. Half of a recent book, “The Well-Grounded Java Developer”, is dedicated to the concept; people now argue that “no one language will rule the cloud” and that “the future [is] polyglot programmers”. But, there are fundamental reasons why the concept never took off, and never will.

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