Category Archives: Internet Explorer

Why (Direct) Democracy is bad for Software Products

It seems that more and more software vendors rely on user feedback tools and forums (such as UserVoice, which I mentioned in a previous post). The thought, in many cases, is that user votes can drive the product development roadmap in a way that resembles democratic elections: the more users vote for a feature, the faster it gets addressed. Some tools even allocate a limited amount of tokens for users and let them distribute the tokens across feature requests.

This thought process quickly translates to communication with customers. For example, at Webcollage we recently evaluated a software product for our development organization. We quickly noticed that the product did not work in our environment, and contacted the vendor. The response we got was:

“This functionality is not supported in [Product Name] at the moment. However, you can add this suggestion on our forum at [URL].”

A few months ago we received a more annoying response from an otherwise respectable vendor, whose software (during our evaluation) did not work as expected in Internet Explorer 8:

“It looks as though we also do not recommend the use of Internet Explorer 8 and under with [Product Name] in general. If IE8 is a requirement for your development team(s), please be sure to comment on and vote up the issue I’ve linked above. Please let us know if you have any other questions.”

Such a response misses the mark in almost every possible way, from customer relationship management (if a customer is evaluating your software, do you really expect them to take the time to vote up bugs?) through product positioning and documentation (you either support Internet Explorer 8 or not; if you do—please fix issues; if you don’t, that’s fine—don’t include it in the list of supported browsers), product planning (are you really relying on frustrated customers to drive your browser support strategy?), through simple business sense (do you really count feedback from all customers in the same way, regardless of their level of use of your software, level of savvy and their business potential?).

It seems to me that this approach is derived from fundamental lack of understanding of democracy, and why direct democracy hasn’t survived.

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The Beginning of the End of Long Software Development Cycles

Last month, Microsoft announced that it would start to automatically upgrade Internet Explorer on users’ PCs, essentially following the route Google Chrome has taken.

This announcement has gained publicity in the Internet-related software community as it was evident that this action was taken to react to Google Chrome’s increasing market share. Within a few years, Google Chrome usage has grown, and it is now not only the second most popular browser overall (surpassing Mozilla Firefox), but also similar in popularity to Internet Explorer 8.0, hence essentially (in a tied race) the most popular specific-version browser overall.

But, the significance of this release transcends the browser war. It highlights that long development cycles are becoming a thing of the past.

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